SAINT KEVIN'S COLLEGE

028 67721417

Derryree, Lisnaskea, BT92, UK

ST KEVIN'S COLLEGE

RELIGION

KS3

Fully Alive Programme

KS4

The RE Department offers two pathways at GCSE level:

  1. WJEC Eduqas Specification: Route A

  2. OCN NI Level 2 Certificate in Religious Education

GCSE Religious Education

WJEC Eduqas (Route A)

Course Information

This is a two-year course. Assessment= 100% exam, no course work or controlled assessment. There are no modules in Year 11-all exams will be completed at end of Year 12 so there is no option to repeat modules/units!

SUMMARY OF ASSESSMENT and SUBJECT CONTENT

ROUTE A

Component 1: Religious, Philosophical and Ethical Studies in the Modern World

Written examination: 2 hours

50% of qualification

Candidates will study the following four themes. All questions are compulsory.

Theme 1: Issues of Relationships (Year 12)

Theme 2: Issues of Life and Death (Year 11)

Theme 3: Issues of Good and Evil (Year 12)

Theme 4: Issues of Human Rights (Year 11)

This component will be assessed by compulsory questions focusing on knowledge,

understanding and evaluation of the identified themes.

 

Component 2: Study of Christianity (Year 12)

Written examination: 1 hour

25% of qualification

Candidates will study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity.

This component will be assessed by compulsory questions focussing on knowledge, understanding and evaluation of the subject content.

  

Component 3: Study of a World Faith (Year 11)

Written examination: 1 hour

25% of qualification

Candidates will study the beliefs, teachings and practices of one world faith: Option 4: Judaism

This component will be assessed by compulsory questions focusing on knowledge,

understanding and evaluation of the subject content.

 

Aims and objectives

 

The WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Religious Studies:

  • develops learners’ knowledge and understanding of religions and non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism

  • develops learners’ knowledge and understanding of religious beliefs, teachings, practices, and sources of wisdom and authority, including through their reading of key religious texts, other texts, and scriptures of the religions they are studying

  • develops learners’ ability to construct well-argued, well-informed, balanced and structured written arguments, demonstrating their depth and breadth of understanding of the subject

  • provides opportunities for learners to engage with questions of belief, value, meaning, purpose, truth, and their influence on human life

  • challenges learners to reflect on and develop their own values, beliefs and attitudes in the light of what they have learnt and contributes to their preparation for adult life in a pluralistic society and global community.

 

Following this specification will enable learners to:

● deepen their understanding of the relationship between people

● become informed about common and divergent views within traditions in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed

● demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the fact that religious traditions of Great Britain/Ireland are, in the main, Christian

● understand that religious traditions in Great Britain/Ireland are diverse and include the following religions: Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism, as well as non-religious beliefs, such as atheism and humanism.

  

WJEC Eduqas GCSE Religious Studies takes a distinctive issues based approach to the study of religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world. The course will also enable learners to gain knowledge and understanding of two

Religions (Christianity and Judaism).

 

ASSESSMENT

Assessment objectives and weightings

AO1

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and belief*, including:

  • beliefs, practices and sources of authority

  • influence on individuals, communities and societies

  • similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs

AO2

Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief*, including their significance and influence.

* The term ‘belief’ includes religious and non-religious beliefs as appropriate to

the subject content requirements.

The following grid demonstrates the allocation of assessment objectives per

component.

Route A

                     AO1           AO2

Component 1:      25%                25%

Component 2:      12.5%              12.5%

Component 3:      12.5%              12.5%

Overall weighting: 50%            50%

  

For each series the learner's spelling, punctuation and grammar will be assessed in specified questions that require extended writing. The total weighting for spelling, punctuation and grammar will be 5% of the sum of all marks available for assessment objectives AO1 to AO2 i.e. 12 marks overall. In this specification SPaG is assessed in Components 1 and 2. Use of specialist terminology will be assessed

throughout all papers.

 

GRADES AVAILABLE

A*-G

PASS GRADES:

A*-C

GCSE R.E

OCN NI LEVEL 2 Certificate in Religious Studies

Introduction:

The OCN NI Level 2 Award in Religious Studies are designed for learners who wish to develop knowledge and understanding in Religious Studies in order to make sense of religious choices people make in today’s society.  It is intended that learners will develop empathy, respect and awareness of other religious beliefs and cultural diversity.  By continuous assessment through building a portfolio, learners will be more motivated and engaged to successfully complete the qualification. 

Assessment requirements:

This qualification allows students who may struggle with written examinations the opportunity to achieve a Level 2 Certificate which is equivalent to a grade B at GCSE. Students will complete 9 pieces of portfolio work (1 per unit) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. There is no external written exam, 100% of the qualification is gained through the completion the portfolio work, all 9 pieces must be submitted and meet he required standard for a student to achieve a pass. Grading for this qualification is pass/fail.

Course Outline:

The following units will be covered:

  1. Addiction

  2. Charity and Religious Charities

  3. Exploring Personal Identity and Faith

  4. Exploring Religious Traditions within Own Community

  5. Life and Death Issues

  6. Life of a Famous Person of Faith

  7. Marriage and Divorce

  8. Prejudice and Discrimination

  9. World Faith

Award Date:

Qualifications will be awarded at the end of Year 12.

KS5

A Level: CCEA Unit 2 The Acts of the Apostles and selected Letters of St. Paul and Unit 5 The Celtic Church

General RE ( 1 period per week compulsory for all Post 16 pupils)

GCE Religious Studies offers an academic approach to the study of religion, ethics and philosophy. It is open to all students of any religious persuasion or none.

 

Religion plays an important role in many different cultures. Religious Studies enables students to develop an insight into areas of knowledge, belief and thought central to an understanding of the modern world.

 

Religious Studies students discuss and critically evaluate contemporary religious ideas. They also investigate and speculate about the ultimate meaning and purpose of life.

 

This qualification is for students who are interested in and enthusiastic about religion and its relation to the local community and the wider world.

 

Religious Studies helps to equip students with many of the skills needed in further and higher education and the work place. Students will develop critical evaluation skills and the ability to construct logical and convincing arguments.

 

 At AS level, students explore other aspects of human experience relating to their subject content.  At A2, students will explore in greater depth the same areas of study covered at AS level, with an emphasis on critical evaluation and synoptic assessment.  At each level, students take two written examinations.

 

 Aims

 

This specification aims to encourage students to:

 

• develop their interest and enthusiasm for Religious Studies;

 

• relate their studies to the local cultural and religious environment and to the wider world;

 

• draw together different areas of knowledge, skills, understanding, synthesis and evaluation via synoptic assessment;

 

• develop higher order thinking skills, for example independent learning, creative thinking and problem-solving, where appropriate;

 

• reflect on and develop their own values, opinions and attitudes in the light of their learning;

 

• develop the ability to make responsible judgements on significant textual, theological, philosophical and moral issues;

 

• work with others in groups both locally and further afield;

 

• develop advanced study skills that help them prepare for third level education and the world of work;

 

• provide extended responses and evidence of quality of written communication; and

 

• demonstrate through challenging external assessments that they can understand and evaluate key concepts

 

 

Key features

 

The following are important features of this specification.

 

• It gives students a choice of options to explore various areas of study in religion.

 

• It allows the study of other aspects of human experience at AS and A2.

 

• Synoptic assessment forms part of the two A2 assessment units. This encourages students to develop their understanding of the subject as a whole.

 

• Study at A2 will stretch and challenge students and provides a sound foundation for higher education and a range of careers.

  

Course Information: Units of Study

A.S Level

 

Unit AS 2: An Introduction to the Acts of the Apostles

 

In this unit students explore the beginnings of the Church of the New Testament.

Students trace the journey of the Gospel, from Jerusalem to Judea and Samaria and into the Gentile world of the first century.

 

At the start of the unit, students set the Acts of the Apostles in the context of the New Testament by studying authorship, date and purpose. They also learn about the organisation and worship of the early Christian community.

 

Students identify the role and importance of key individuals in the growth and expansion of the Church and assess their contribution. Students focus on Peter, Stephen and Philip with the start of the missionary work in Jerusalem, and the first expansion to Judea and Samaria. They study Paul’s work as a missionary and evangelist through his missionary journeys and speeches.

 

Students also explore the relationship between the Acts of the Apostles and other aspects of human experience.

 

Assessment for this unit consists of a written examination.

  

Unit AS 5: The Celtic Church in Ireland in the Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Centuries

 

In this unit students explore the origins, development and nature of the Celtic Church in Ireland from its pagan roots. They explore the various debates on the arrival of Christianity in Ireland and focus on the mission and writings of Patrick.

 

Students learn about evidence and scholarly opinion on all the issues they study, along with relevant documents in the case of Patrick.

 

Students focus on the origins and development of Celtic monasticism. They examine the impact and importance of monasticism in Ireland and elsewhere.

 

In the theme of Celtic hagiography, students examine the content and features of key texts along with their historical value and reliability.

  

Students also explore the relationship between the Celtic Church in Ireland in the fifth, sixth and seventh centuries and other aspects of human experience.

 

Assessment for this unit consists of a written examination.

 

Course Information: Units of Study

A.2 Level

 

 Unit A2 2: Themes in Selected Letters of St Paul

 

This unit builds on the study of Paul’s missionary activity completed at AS level.

 

Students explore Paul’s role as a Christian evangelist in greater depth through his letters to the churches established during his missionary journeys in Acts.

 

Students engage in detailed study of three New Testament texts and critically assess the importance of Paul’s teaching for early Christian communities and the Church today. Students also focus on the role of Paul as pastor and theologian.

 

In the final theme on controversy, division and resolution students examine the problem of controversy in religion and highlight some potential areas of conflict.

 

The contribution of religion in encouraging dialogue and resolution is an important issue relating to controversy and division.

 

Students initially study this theme in relation to New Testament texts. It then provides a perspective from which students can consider the content of other units.

 

Assessment for this unit consists of a written examination.

 

Unit A2 5: Themes in the Celtic Church, Reformation and

Post-Reformation Church

 

The first sections of this unit consist of a theme in the Celtic Church followed by a similar theme in the Post-Reformation Church.

 

Students study missionary outreach, including the motivation and work of the Celtic Peregrini and the importance of Columbanus. This links to missionary outreach in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the challenges posed by secularisation and atheism.

 

Students also study the theme of controversy and reform through the ages.

 

In the final theme on faith, morality and the state students consider the relationship between religious faith and state authority. This includes lessons that can be learned from historical and contemporary examples.

 

The role religion plays in reconciliation is an important issue relating to faith and the state. Students initially study this theme in relation to the Celtic Church and Post-Reformation Church history.

 

It then provides a perspective from which students can consider the content of other units.

 

 

Assessment for this unit consists of a written examination.

 

 

A2 units have an element of synoptic assessment (to assess students’ understanding of the subject as a whole), as well as more emphasis on assessment objectives that reflect higher order thinking skills.

Assessment opportunities

 

Each unit is available for assessment in summer each year.

 

It is possible to resit individual AS and A2 assessment units once and count the better result for each unit towards an AS or A level qualification.

 

The full Advanced GCE award is based on students’ marks from the AS (40 percent) and the A2 (60 percent).

 

Assessment objectives

 

There are two assessment objectives for this specification.

Candidates should be able to:

 

• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion, including:

 

– religious, philosophical and/or ethical thought and teaching;

 

– influence of beliefs, teachings and practices on individuals, communities and societies;

 

– cause and significance of similarities and differences in belief, teaching and practice; and

 

– approaches to the study of religion and belief (AO1); and

 

• analyse and evaluate aspects of, and approaches to, religion and belief, including their significance, influence and study (AO2).

 

Assessment for Units AS 1–AS 8

 

• Two examination papers (each from a different area of study).

 

• The total time for each paper is 1 hour 20 minutes.

 

• Each paper has two sections: Section A and Section B.

 

• Candidates answer one from two questions in Section A and one from two questions in Section B.

 

• Each question has two parts:

 

– part (a) assesses AO1; and

 

– part (b) assesses AO2.

 

• In Section B, the part (b) of the question will focus on other aspects of human experience.

 

• The questions will be marked using the appropriate band descriptors.

 

• Quality of written communication is written into each band descriptor.

 

Assessment for Units A2 1–A2 8

 

• Two examination papers (each from a different area of study).

 

• The total time for each paper is 2 hours.

 

• Each paper has two sections: Section A and Section B.

 

• Candidates answer two from three questions in Section A and the compulsory synoptic question in Section B.

 

The questions in Section A have two parts:

 

– part (a) assesses AO1; and

 

– part (b) assesses AO2.

 

• The compulsory question in Section B has two parts:

 

– part (a) relates to the set theme and areas of study and assesses AO1; and

 

– part (b) relates to other aspects of human experience and assesses AO2.

 

• The questions will be marked using the appropriate band descriptors.

 

• Quality of written communication is written into each band descriptor.